The Marriage of Thomas Medhurst and Mary Wingrove

After finally completing the last of my ProGen chats, I am jumping right back in with my research on my paternal side.  After solving the mystery of my adopted great grandmother’s real parentage, I have been able to progress backwards several more generations.  Things took an exciting turn this weekend when I discovered the marriage bann of my 5 x Great Grandparents Thomas Medhurst and Mary Wingrove.

 

Thomas Medhurst Mary Wingrove
“London, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921,” database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com: accessed 2 Nov 2018), entry for Medhurst-Wingrove, 10 April 1785; citing London Metropolitan Archives, Church of England Parish Registers, P71/mmg/055)                 

 

 

Thomas and Mary married on 10th April 1785 at St Mary Magdalene Church, Bermondsey, Surrey.   Interestingly, several of my maternal ancestors lived in this same area at the same time.   This inspired me to look for proof that they may have known each other, or at least, had mutual acquaintances.

I ended up discovering that in 1785, Thomas Medhurst owned property in Bermondsey.  Several streets away, my maternal 6x Great Grandparent Benjamin Edghill was renting a property from a Benjamin Hodgson.  Although definite proof that the families knew each other likely does not exist, small developing areas such as Bermondsey were relatively tight knit communities so it is not beyond the realm of possibility that their paths may have crossed.

Thomas Medhursy tax 1785
“Surrey, England, Land Tax Records, 1780-1832”, database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com: accessed 5 Nov 2018), entry for Thomas Medhurst, 1785, Bermondsey, Roll No. 89, Ref No. 992367; citing Surrey Land Tax, Surrey History Centre.
Benj Edghhill tax 1785
Surrey, England, Land Tax Records, 1780-1832″, database and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com: accessed 5 Nov 2018), entry for Benj” Edghill, 1785, Bermondsey, Roll No. 89, Ref No. 992367; citing Surrey Land Tax, Surrey History Centre.

 

 

 

I wonder if they would have believed that several generations in the future, their families would be combined?

 

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